The Element of Divine Life

29a“In Him was life, and the life was the light of men.” -Jn. 1.4

Was there ever a man who walked the earth that carried a greater burden for the sins of the world than the Son of God? Was there ever a man who walked the earth with a deeper consciousness of the judgments to come, and the devastating events that the prophets have foretold? Was there ever a man more holy than He? More broken? More selfless? More concerned for mankind? More marked with eternal sight and Divine seriousness?

I find it remarkable that while He was the most broken and serious man who ever walked the earth, He was simultaneously the most kind and joyful man in history. The writer to the Hebrews gives this quote from Psalm 45 in reference to Jesus:

“You have loved righteousness and hated wickedness; therefore God, your God, has set you above your fellows by anointing you with the oil of joy.” -Heb. 1.9

In Luke 10.21 “he rejoiced greatly in the Holy Spirit…”

In Mark 10, while Jesus was addressing the religious leaders on the issue of divorce, we have another remarkable example.

When children were being brought to Him, the disciples rebuked the ones who were interrupting Jesus’ teaching with their little ones. Jesus became “indignant” about this, charging them to bring the children to Him, and He laid His hands on them and blessed them. How do you transition from a serious confrontation regarding divorce with religious leaders, to a simple faith and compassion in the blessing of little children? Remember, His blessing was something more than a verbal exercise. The life of the Father was working through Him to impart blessing and grace to these little ones. This was no religious performance, it was a Divine transaction. How did He do it?

The answer is simple, though it is scarcely realized by saints in our day. He was just as much in the Life in tense surroundings as He was in moments of exterior tranquility.

Could it be that the seriousness of Jesus’ dialogue with the religious leaders had put the disciples into a mode of somberness that Jesus never intended? Could it be that we are often taking our views too far, leaving behind the Spirit of Life to carry burdens in a way that He has not desired? Jesus was serious in a way we’ve never known, but He never lost the element of Divine Life. He was somber and intense in thought and speech, but He never lost the oil of joy.

Why is it that we are often found in one of two erroneous places? On the one hand, we are often found wasting away our days with frivolous speech and entertainment, totally unaware of the gravity of eternal reality. On the other hand, we are often taking ourselves too seriously, acting somber and spiritual while lacking the oil of joy that results from the active presence of the Holy Spirit in our lives.

Jesus was perfectly serious, and entirely joyful at the same time. His speech and thought were not something religiously contrived, nor were they tainted by the frivolity of the world. He was anointed with the oil of joy, and this marked Him out as distinct and transcendent. 

The element of Divine Life was not only reserved for Jesus. He went to the cross so that we too could become “partakers of the divine nature.” (2 Pet. 1.4)

Does your present experience of faith include the life and joy which comes from the Holy Spirit? Turn away from wasteful, frivolous living. Set aside hyper-serious religiosity. Receive the Holy Spirit, dear saint. He is the great Helper, and He will lead us into eternal realities and prophetic burdens, while keeping our spirits free from bondage. He will enable us to rejoice in the mighty love of God Himself.

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